Just Leave!!

 

Burnout sometimes puts you in a difficult situation. On one hand you have to and want to do everything, on the other hand you are not there yet. Your body sees that as a threat and will react on that. Make sure there is a way out. Nothing is worse than being trapped in fear and panic while trying to get out of the situation.

 

It’s not about beauty or what should be, but at this stage you just have to leave. Literally step out of the situation. 

That feels weird and strange at first, but you learn that you’re in a situation you don’t want to be in. 

Get up and go. You better pay attention next time.

Own experience:

I was on the train from Nijmegen to Molenhoek (5 minutes) and I felt: this is not good I want to leave. I panicked and when we got there I was sweating. The idea that I couldn’t get out of this small space frightened me the most.

I then thought I always want to be able to escape the situation. I don’t care what the environment thinks. I’ll leave if I have to.

I’ve also left a few other times: at a movie, at a lunch, visiting family, etc. Then it felt like too much, all the alarm bells went off. I just left.

Positive

You choose for yourself in a special way. You notice this doesn’t work. 

Is it fleeing? Perhaps, but you should see this as a moment of success. You used to sit dutifully, now you make a different choice. You feel this is right and you act accordingly. That is 100% profit compared, before the burn out.

Tips:

1.   Make sure this escape is there and use it if you need it

2.   Realize that this is an emergency brake and you only use it in an emergency

3.   Think of yourself and don’t feel guilty about the others. You have the burn out

4.   This is being kind to yourself.

 

Keep it going it will be fine!!

If you are going to use this way out, you will also have to think about where it is in advance. I found it very soothing that I knew in advance where my escape was and could act accordingly in case of an emergency.

 

Making up the escape is also helpful later in the recovery. This is especially necessary when you go back to work (I wrote a piece about it).

 

So, my advice to you: see where your escape is and use it when you need it. If necessary, share this with the people around you, so that they can take it into account.

 

I still use the escape now and then. When visitors come, or when I have to go shopping, Then I notice that it is too much, and I leave. Just like that.